10 Steps to Creating a Stunning Vertical Garden

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Vertical Garden

Create Stunning Hanging Baskets for your Vertical Garden

With UK gardens set to be celebrated this Summer, there are some clever and cheap ways you can create stunning spaces for not only flowers but also to grow your own produce.

If you are limited on space then a ‘vertical garden’ might be just the thing. It’s a trendy way of growing plants on a suspended panel, it can be either attached to a wall or freestanding.

There are lots of options available to buy, some have individual pots for plants so you can switch it up for maximum sunlight.

If you get a solar powered pump then you can set a timer for the watering of the plants and you can easily add liquid feed in too.

Starter kits are available from a number of retailers and your vertical garden can be made up of edible plants or more ornamental varieties.

10 Steps on Creating the Perfect Hanging Garden

Stannah’s Gardening Expert, Mark Lane — who you may enjoy watching on BBC Gardeners’ World and BBC Morning Live — shares his tips on arranging a stunning hanging basket, from the materials you need, to flower inspiration and positioning pointers.

Hanging baskets offer a wonderful welcome to the home, plus are a lovely way of introducing extra colour, texture and scent into a garden without compromising on space. And, with a few adaptations can be accessible and useable by all. If you are designing a garden or looking to add floral features to your home, here are my top 10 steps and top tips to creating a beautiful, bountiful hanging basket:

1. Gather your materials

Before going to the garden centre or shopping online, make some notes and a shopping list.

You will need the following:

  • A basket
  • A liner
  • Compost
  • Water-retentive granules
  • Plants
  • A slow-release fertiliser
  • Handy extras include a strong chain, hooks, raw plugs or a metal bracket

To make life that little bit simpler, I recommend a hi-lo mechanism, which means you can pull your hanging basket up and down with ease. Baskets with a self-watering reservoir will help when it comes to watering.

2. Choose your plants

Fashions come and go but I think good reliable plants such as Fuchsia, Pelargonium, Petunia, Surfinia, Calibrachoa and trailing plants such as Hedera, Lobelia, Bacopa, Dichondra and Helichrysum work best. Herbs and wildflowers also make excellent specimens in hanging baskets. Besides looking beautiful, these blooms attract pollinators. Spotting local wildlife is a fun activity with children, which engages their senses — and it’s highly fulfilling knowing you’re feeding the bees.

For a modern twist on the traditional hanging basket, why not plant up succulents like Echeveria, Dischidia and Sedum? Adding a climber or two to grow up the chains is an often overlooked, but a lovely, touch.

3.Decide on the style of basket

Will it be metal-framed with a liner, or a plastic one with removeable slots for positioning plants? Perhaps you like a natural willow basket, a half basket or a full circular basket, a self-watering basket or one with a water reservoir. There are lots of hanging baskets options to choose from.

4. Choose where to position your hanging basket

Ideally you want the basket to be sheltered from strong winds and placed in full sun or partial shade and away from the rain shadow of the house. You will also need a strong hook, fixed securely.

Hanging Basket

5. Line your basket

Traditionally sphagnum moss is used, but ready-made liners are available to buy. If you are on a budget, then why not cut up a compost bag with the black inside facing outwards? An old woollen jumper works just as well as the moss. Whatever you decide to choose, place a pot saucer in the bottom to stop water running straight through it.

6.Use a good peat-free multi-purpose compost

Mix in some water-retentive granules and a slow-release fertiliser (unless the compost already comes with both). Make up this mix before you start, and not as you go.

7.Position your plants

Start by inserting a few plants through slots in the side of the hanging basket. Upright plants can go in the middle of the basket at the top, surrounded by more cascading plants. The more you can fit in, the better the display. Gently flatten and spread the root ball of plants so more can be added. Firm the compost around the plants as you go.

8. Hang your basket

Aim for the hanging basket to hang at eye level or just below so that you can enjoy the flowers.

9.Water thoroughly using a fine hose

Hanging baskets can dry out quickly, so water at least once a day — either early morning or late evening. Rotate the basket so that all sides get some sun. If we are blessed with warm, dry weather then you may need to water both morning and evening.

10. Six weeks after planting, start a weekly liquid feed

This could be a tomato or seaweed feed. Don’t forget to remove dead flowers regularly to prolong flowering.

If you’d like to let the outdoors in and brighten the interior of your home, you could always consider a hanging house plant. Opt for colours and a style of basket that complement your décor.

Creating a hanging basket is such a rewarding and relaxing way to spend an afternoon, whether you’re enjoying a spot of ‘me time’ or entertaining a little one.

Your physical and mental wellbeing will truly benefit, while your home or garden will look all the more loved!

 

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